Sunday, September 21st, 2014
The Layman Online > 2014 General Assembly (PCUSA) > The subtle attempt to take Israel out of the Bible

The subtle attempt to take Israel out of the Bible

For-PsalmsBy Susan Michael, Charisma News

New Christians struggling to study their Bible are often taught to read the Scriptures as though they were written personally to them, even reciting the scriptures using one’s own name in place of the verse’s subject. While it is important to apply Scripture to one’s own life, it is equally important to not ignore the original context of the scripture and the original recipient of that particular promise.

For example, a special verse that brings comfort to a person who may be experiencing difficulty is Isaiah 49:16 “See, I have inscribed you [insert name] on the palms of My hands.” This verse lets the believer know that they are known by the Lord, and He holds them before Him, as it were, in the palms of His hands. It is a beautiful verse.

It may be a great surprise to many to learn that the verse is originally intended for Jerusalem, the city that personifies the people of Israel, for verse 17 goes on to say “Your walls are continually before Me.” An over-personalization of the scriptures can actually result in a Christian who can recite verses from their Bible but has failed to understand what the book is about.

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8 comments

  1. James says:

    It’s very rare to see a Charisma article published in a presbyterian publication.

  2. Andrew says:

    What she meant, Mike, is that the nails were put into the hands of the Crucified one by each one of us, who [insert your name] were forgiven for that and all the other crimes. John 20:25: “Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into his side, I will not believe.”

  3. ZZMike says:

    Where did the “[insert name]” come from? It doesn’t seem to be i the original text.

  4. Andrew says:

    Dear Susan,
    “verse 17 goes on to say Your walls are continually before Me” is a mistake. The Greek has at verse 16: “Look! On my palms I painted your walls, and you are always before me.” Verse 17 says in the Greek: “You’ll rapidly be built from those who destroyed you, and those who wrecked you go forth from you.” “Be built” is the Greek way of reading the Hebrew letters that also mean “your sons.” See King James: “Thy children shall make haste; thy destroyers and they that made thee waste shall go forth of thee,” which makes clear that childbirth is the theme. Why this pregnant woman painted walls on her hands before childbirth is beyond me. Maybe they didn’t have cribs in those days. Luke 2:7: “and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.” The mother – Mary – daydreamed about walls that would make her childbirth private and painted them on her hands as a diversion. She didn’t get the walls, but what she got was a carpenter to build her a house. Mark 6:3: “Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary?”

  5. John says:

    “Isaiah 46:13 I bring near my righteousness; it shall not be far off, and my salvation shall not tarry: and I will place salvation in Zion for Israel my glory.”

    “While it is important to apply Scripture to one’s own life, it is equally important to not ignore the original context of the scripture and the original recipient of that particular promise.”

    Yes, observe, interpret, correlate and apply the verse in context of what is written objectively with Biblical Exposition teaching and preaching.

  6. Justin says:

    The article lost me at “Replacement Theology.”

    • Howard says:

      Replacement theology? Where?

      • Doug says:

        Replacement theology is mentioned in the continuation of the link at the bottom of the article above. There can be an interesting discussion about how the church fulfills the promises to Israel, but within the PCUSA, it’s hard to have a fruitful discussion on doctrine if the source for doctrine, Scripture, is not respected as the source of doctrine.

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