The Presbyterian Lay Committee https://www.layman.org Fri, 22 Sep 2017 14:38:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 First Presbyterian Church of Wyandotte (PCUSA) to Close After 161 Years https://www.layman.org/first-presbyterian-church-wyandotte-pcusa-close-161-years/ https://www.layman.org/first-presbyterian-church-wyandotte-pcusa-close-161-years/#respond Fri, 22 Sep 2017 14:38:44 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84330 (By Shannon Rossi For The News-Herald, Michigan) When the final worship service is held at 10:30 a.m. Sept. 24 at the First Presbyterian Church of Wyandotte, 161 years of service to the community will end. Despite the loss of the building itself, the remaining members of the congregation will carry their memories of the camaraderie they...

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(By Shannon Rossi For The News-Herald, Michigan) When the final worship service is held at 10:30 a.m. Sept. 24 at the First Presbyterian Church of Wyandotte, 161 years of service to the community will end.

Despite the loss of the building itself, the remaining members of the congregation will carry their memories of the camaraderie they shared throughout the years, as well as all of the marriages and baptisms and choirs and Bible studies, for the rest of their lives.

Doris Karr, 92, is a lifelong member of the church and Wyandotte resident.

“I’ve lived at three addresses in my life,” Karr said. “I was born on Poplar, lived on Emmons from ages 2 to 27 and have lived on 16th Street since then.”

Her history with the church actually stretches back even further. Karr’s parents were married in the former church building, at the corner of Chestnut and First Streets, until its demolition in the 1960s.

“We outgrew the old church,” she said. “There were probably about 1,000 members back then.”

Because of the size of the congregation in the early 1960s, a larger building was opened to the congregation. The beams on the ceiling of the church are Ponderosa pine, brought from the western part of the country on rail cars. The stained glass windows surrounding the sanctuary tell Bible stories, as well as the stories of some of the members of the congregation.

“Sometimes the pastor would stand by each window and use it as a teaching tool,” said Karr.

But the windows also honor at least two of the church’s past members. One window, on the left side of the altar, near where the choir would sit, was placed in memory of Capt. Henry F. Kresin, father of lifelong congregation member Jim Kresin, 80.

“My father was a ship’s captain for Wyandotte Chemicals for many years,” Kresin said.

When Captain Kresin died in the 1960s, two windows, one featuring the words of hymn “For those in peril on the sea” and the one below featuring a ship’s captain, were designed and placed to honor his years of service to the church.

Another window near the front of the sanctuary honors the father of Deanna Hibbler, the church’s music director. The church also holds four stained glass windows, created around 1899, that came over from the old church.

Barb Macrae of Ann Arbor applied for and accepted the position to be a transitional minister at First Presbyterian Church, 2250 Oak St., in June 2016.

“I knew closing the church was a possibility when I interviewed for the position,” said Macrae, who has been a pastor for 20 years. “My job was to help the congregation discern what was possible.”

‘It has to happen’

According to Macrae, the church had been doing well enough to stay open until about five years ago. There was a lack of communication between members and pastors, causing the congregation to dwindle.

“It has to happen,” Karr said. “Seventeen people, which is about all we have at services on Sundays, can’t keep the church going.”

READ MORE … 

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PCUSA’s Attempt at Clarity Does Just the Opposite https://www.layman.org/pcusas-attempt-clarity-just-opposite/ https://www.layman.org/pcusas-attempt-clarity-just-opposite/#comments Fri, 22 Sep 2017 14:19:56 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84326 (By Bill Bumpas, One News Now). In an attempt to clarify its stance on human sexuality, the Presbyterian Church (USA) has appeared to muddy the waters even more. The denomination felt the need to respond to the beliefs on biblical sexuality laid out in “The Nashville Statement” by a coalition of conservative evangelical leaders – which...

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(By Bill Bumpas, One News Now). In an attempt to clarify its stance on human sexuality, the Presbyterian Church (USA) has appeared to muddy the waters even more.

The denomination felt the need to respond to the beliefs on biblical sexuality laid out in “The Nashville Statement” by a coalition of conservative evangelical leaders – which says, in part: “We did not make ourselves. We are not our own. Our true identity, as male and female persons, is given by God. It is not only foolish, but hopeless, to try to make ourselves what God did not create us to be.”

The PCUSA’s Office of Theology & Worship made this statement in response: “One way to put it is that, as a denomination, we have become agnostic around issues of homosexuality.”

OneNewsNow sought reaction from Carmen Fowler LaBerge, president of the Presbyterian Lay Committee.

“For the church to suggest that she could be agnostic about anything or agnostic in general is a pretty devastating revelation of her failure to know God and how God has revealed Himself,” she states.

What else cannot be known, wonders the host of The Reconnect, a daily Christian talk-radio program.

READ MORE … 

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COGA discusses “joyous” budget, hike in per capita https://www.layman.org/coga-discusses-joyous-budget-hike-per-capita/ https://www.layman.org/coga-discusses-joyous-budget-hike-per-capita/#comments Thu, 21 Sep 2017 14:03:02 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84314 (By Leslie Scanlon, The Presbyterian Outlook). The Committee on the Office of the General Assembly (COGA) is considering what’s being described as a “joyous” budget for 2019 and 2020 – a budget that would include a per capita increase from $7.73 per member in 2018 to $10.11 in 2019 and $10.82 in 2020. That would amount...

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(By Leslie Scanlon, The Presbyterian Outlook). The Committee on the Office of the General Assembly (COGA) is considering what’s being described as a “joyous” budget for 2019 and 2020 – a budget that would include a per capita increase from $7.73 per member in 2018 to $10.11 in 2019 and $10.82 in 2020.

That would amount to a 30 percent per capita increase from 2018 to 2019, and overall a 44 percent increase from the current rate of $7.50 per member in 2017 to $10.82 per member in 2020.

In presenting this budget for discussion now, leaders of the Office of the General Assembly (OGA) are testing the waters – it won’t come up for a formal vote until COGA’s meeting in Feb. 6-8, 2018, and potentially could be revised before then. And even from COGA members, there was some initial pushback.

J. Herbert Nelson, stated clerk of the Presbyterian Church (USA), said the proposed budget is structured to allow OGA to better serve the church – including providing leadership training and support for mid councils.

“We need to bring it with joy, and not trepidation,” said John Wood, who works for OGA and is part of OGA’s budget team. “This is for the whole church,” and reflects “a posture of abundance, and not scarcity.”

Wood also said: “We can’t live in the church we want to live in by having cost control” as the only priority. “We need to be helping the mid councils. We need to be where the need is.”

READ MORE … 

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Hurricanes and Harambe: How Our Culture Puts Animals Before People https://www.layman.org/hurricanes-harambe-culture-puts-animals-people/ https://www.layman.org/hurricanes-harambe-culture-puts-animals-people/#comments Wed, 20 Sep 2017 17:07:14 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84310 From a Christian and biblical worldview, human beings are uniquely created in God’s image — let us always know and remember that (By Carmen Fowler LaBerge, LifeZette) As Hurricane Irma bore down on Tampa, Florida, a friend posted a plea on Facebook that someone take in her cat; another friend fleeing Hilton Head Island posted...

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From a Christian and biblical worldview, human beings are uniquely created in God’s image — let us always know and remember that

(By Carmen Fowler LaBerge, LifeZette) As Hurricane Irma bore down on Tampa, Florida, a friend posted a plea on Facebook that someone take in her cat; another friend fleeing Hilton Head Island posted the need for shelter for her family of four — and three dogs. There was the story of the man who, for lack of a pet carrier, was denied evacuation. He chose to endure the storm’s fury rather than leave his dog behind.

There were stories of people risking their lives to care for dolphins and to save manatees, flamingos, even alligators. Horses were rescued by brave cowboys, police escorted cattle through the streets, and chickens were wrapped in newspaper burritos for careful transport in family cars.

The prayer at our house as the waters rose in Texas was not only for the people — but for the “many cattle.” As heartless as we can sometimes be, the stewardship for the creature class runs deep in the human soul and we grieve, in the aftermath of the storms, the loss of so many animals.

From whence does that affection and concern spring? It’s part of who we are as image-bearers of a good and gracious God.

God saw the animals He had made and called them good. In the pouring out of His wrath in the great flood in the days of Noah, God’s ark provided a way to preserve the animal kingdom. In Jonah chapter 4, we witness the drama of the prophet’s angry resistance and God’s overwhelming compassion toward the city of Nineveh.

God says, “And should not I pity Nineveh, that great city, in which there are more than 120,000 persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and also much cattle?” God’s concern for people who do not know what they do not know is clear, but so, too, is God’s concern for the many cattle.

In creation, God gave humanity the responsibility to manage and steward the earth. That stewardship extends to animals. The recent hurricanes have been reminders not only of our vulnerability and the fragility of human life, but of utter dependence of animals upon us. Animals are not human. They do not have the ability to reason or read satellite imagery, nor jump into a car to flee the rising waters. They also do not have the capacity to organize a disaster response or rebuild their own habitats.

For all the times we hear it argued that animals are just like people — they are not.

READ MORE …

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Presbytery Will Petition U.S. Supreme Court to Review Church Property Case https://www.layman.org/presbytery-will-petition-u-s-supreme-court-review-church-property-case/ https://www.layman.org/presbytery-will-petition-u-s-supreme-court-review-church-property-case/#comments Wed, 20 Sep 2017 16:12:02 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84305 The Presbytery of Twin Cities Area (PCTA) will petition the U.S. Supreme Court to review its property case against Prairie Community Church in Eden Prairie, Minn. In July, the Minnesota Supreme Court denied a similar petition from the presbytery to review the decision the Minnesota Court of Appeals in favor of Prairie Community Church of...

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The Presbytery of Twin Cities Area (PCTA) will petition the U.S. Supreme Court to review its property case against Prairie Community Church in Eden Prairie, Minn.

In July, the Minnesota Supreme Court denied a similar petition from the presbytery to review the decision the Minnesota Court of Appeals in favor of Prairie Community Church of Twin Cities (formerly known as Eden Prairie Presbyterian Church).

The Court of Appeals’ April 24 decision upheld the March 24, 2016 ruling by the Fourth Judicial District Court, which concluded that the Prairie Community Church of Twin Cities “owns the disputed property and that the disputed property is not held in trust for the PCUSA, and the PTCA and PCUSA have no legal interest in the disputed property.”

AC Report to Presbytery

The presbytery-appointed Administrative Commission announced its unanimous decision to petition the U.S. Supreme Court at the Sept. 12 presbytery meeting.

“This was not an easy decision for any of us. It was made, not through disappointment or anger, but rather a commitment to the PCUSA and our commitment to who we are as a church. We believe the court rulings go beyond a single church, a single property, or a single presbytery. We believe the Minnesota courts have failed to allow the presbytery and the PCUSA to govern ourselves without interference,” the AC’s report said.

It continued that the decision was based on several facts:

“First, we remain unsure of the effect of the MN court rulings, both on churches in this presbytery as well as PCUSA churches within Minnesota, and even churches in other states or other denominations. Part of that can, and must, be addressed by holding churches and elders accountable to our polity and to their ordination vows. But that action alone does not address what other parts of the PCUSA Constitution are vulnerable to civil court scrutiny.

“Secondly, we believe that this is a question of our fundamental freedom to govern ourselves as a church. It is a question of our identity as a denomination; our commitment to our ordination vows; and of our faith in and significance of our Constitution.

“Third is our belief that it is our responsibility, as part of the connectional church, to attempt to clarify the position of the courts on the property trust clause. Yes, we could wait for another presbytery or another denomination to ask SCOTUS for this clarification, but with our status at this point in time, we have the opportunity, perhaps duty, to pursue this avenue of appeal. We may not succeed in our petition to have the court hear our case this time, but we will have raised the issue before the court, and that could be an influence on a similar case in the future.”

The legal work will be done by the New York law firm Weil Gotshal, “which has agreed to serve as the lead counsel in the appeal to SOCTUS on a pro bono basis,” the report said. “Weil Gotshal has been involved in several cases in the PCUSA and knows our polity very well.”

Court of Appeals decision

The Court of Appeals ruled that the District Court was correct when it applied neutral principles of law. Under neutral principles, the court bases its decision in neutral, secular principles, looking at official documents such as property deeds and state statutes.

The court’s decision stated that while the church had created an express trust when it modified its articles of incorporation in 1999, it had also retained the right to modify the documents by a majority vote of the active church members at a properly called congregational meeting.

So, in 2010, when the church voted to remove all references to the trust and the PCUSA from its Articles of Incorporation, “it was within its rights.”

“Thus, EPPC retained the power to revoke the trust and properly revoked the trust by removing all trust language in 2010,” it read.

 

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Prayers and Support for ECO Churches in Florida and Texas https://www.layman.org/prayers-support-eco-churches-florida-texas/ https://www.layman.org/prayers-support-eco-churches-florida-texas/#respond Tue, 19 Sep 2017 15:59:05 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84301 (Article originally posted on the ECO web site). Dear Friends, Members of the Synod staff have been in contact with churches affected by the devastating storms in the Southeast; most recently those that endured Hurricane Irma in Florida. Though many churches themselves had minor structural damage, some are still without power, and many have downed...

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(Article originally posted on the ECO web site). Dear Friends,

Members of the Synod staff have been in contact with churches affected by the devastating storms in the Southeast; most recently those that endured Hurricane Irma in Florida. Though many churches themselves had minor structural damage, some are still without power, and many have downed trees and other property issues to deal with.

World Renew

Our first response is always to connect people to World Renew. World Renew is an ECO partner and disaster assistance organization that mobilized in both affected regions. You can stay informed by signing up for email updates or visiting their website WorldRenew.net to read about their ongoing relief efforts for both Harvey and Irma, or scanning their volunteer page, which lists numerous on-the-ground service opportunities for people who desire to help victims of the storm.

Donate Directly

Secondly, we encourage people to send financial support directly to the ECO presbyteries of Texas and Florida. With direct contact to those churches and communities, the presbytery is in the best position to administer those funds to people in need. Checks can be made out for:
 

Hurricane Harvey

ECO: Presbytery of Texas
c/o Highland Park Presbyterian Church
Attn. Mark Story, Moderator
3821 University Blvd.
Dallas, Texas 75205.

Hurricane Irma

ECO: Presbytery of Florida
c/o First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville
118 East Monroe Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Attn: Moderator or Treasurer


Donate Digitally: CLICK HERE

Thank You!

It is amazing to see God at work in the midst of a terrible situation. We are hearing stories of our churches serving as shelters and deeply caring for the communities in which they serve. Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church is one such example. They are set up to be a Red Cross shelter, but when the Red Cross staff couldn’t make it in, the good folks of MDPC stepped up and filled in the gaps. Several of these churches have their own funds set up to receive donations as well. We envision the need for work teams in the Keys, just as they are in Houston now, in the coming weeks.  We will keep you informed of those opportunities.
Thank you for your continued support and prayers,
The ECO Synod Office

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Ravi Zacharias Remembers His Young Protégé, Nabeel Qureshi https://www.layman.org/ravi-zacharias-remembers-young-protege-nabeel-qureshi/ https://www.layman.org/ravi-zacharias-remembers-young-protege-nabeel-qureshi/#respond Tue, 19 Sep 2017 15:00:48 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84298 (By Ravi Zacharias, Christianity Today). The first time I saw Nabeel Qureshi, he sat at a table across from me, his one leg constantly moving almost subconsciously, warming up for a run. It was a habit of his restless disposition. That was Nabeel in true expression; he hated sitting still. He was a man with...

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(By Ravi Zacharias, Christianity Today). The first time I saw Nabeel Qureshi, he sat at a table across from me, his one leg constantly moving almost subconsciously, warming up for a run. It was a habit of his restless disposition.

That was Nabeel in true expression; he hated sitting still. He was a man with a mission, ready to run. Sadly, for us, he finished his race all too soon and our hearts are broken at the loss of one who ran with spectacular passion to do what filled his soul.

He was a thorough-going evangelical. He held dear the gospel of Jesus Christ as revealed in the Old and New Testaments and carried the message of salvation. Jesus’ grace for a transformed heart was his message.

For years as a young man, he labored and struggled to gain “righteousness before God” only to find out that righteousness was already met in the cross through Jesus Christ. That was his message in his best-selling book, Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus.

Qureshi was not just an evangelical; he was passionately evangelistic. He desired to cover the globe with the good news that God’s forgiveness was available to all. I have seldom seen a man with such deep conviction and proportionate passion and gifting. When he spoke, he held audiences spellbound.

I invited him to join our team at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries (RZIM) four and a half years ago. He placed one condition, and I placed one condition. His condition was that after he joined, he’d travel with me for one year, to observe and learn. I asked that after the year, he’d go to Oxford. I wanted him to complete his doctorate to be better prepared to answer the toughest questions a Christian apologist faces—and to do it with gentleness, respect, and learning. He agreed.

He called me “uncle.” He became part of our team. Everywhere he went, they wanted him back. After every talk we would have a meal together, and he would ask me, “Uncle, how did I do?”

I tear up as I think of the meal we had a little over a year ago. Nabeel was a man with a daunting appetite. I used to joke in his presence, “Don’t get behind him in a buffet line; there will be nothing left.” He would chuckle with his winsome smile. I wish I could see that smile again. He could make a big meal look like an appetizer.

I noticed that he was just nibbling away at his food. I said, “Nabeel, are you not going to eat?” He said, “Uncle, I have been having some strange sensations in my stomach.” I asked how long that had been going on, and he said it had been a few weeks. I urged him to have it checked out. He said he was planning on it.

The rest is history.

READ MORE …

Related articles

Died: Nabeel Qureshi, Author of ‘Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus’

Nabeel Qureshi’s testimony: Christ Called Me Off the Minaret

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Another Presbyterian Lament: In All Things, Charity, A Progressive Christian Believes in These Core values https://www.layman.org/another-presbyterian-lament-things-charity-progressive-christian-believes-core-values/ https://www.layman.org/another-presbyterian-lament-things-charity-progressive-christian-believes-core-values/#comments Mon, 18 Sep 2017 14:44:41 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84293 (By the Rev. Janet Edwards, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Written in response to the lament published by the Post-Gazette on 9/9/17 by Holly Lott, “A Presbyterian’s lament: Our church is forsaking core values with ‘reform’ that deforms.“). When I was ordained in September 1977 to the office of Minister of Word and Sacrament in what is...

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(By the Rev. Janet Edwards, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Written in response to the lament published by the Post-Gazette on 9/9/17 by Holly Lott, “A Presbyterian’s lament: Our church is forsaking core values with ‘reform’ that deforms.“).

When I was ordained in September 1977 to the office of Minister of Word and Sacrament in what is now the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), there were 92,792 members among 194 churches in Allegheny County. Now there are 137 churches with 28,518 members.

When Holly Lott and her congregation leave — as she wrote in this space last week (“ ‘Reform’ That Deforms, Sept. 9 Weekend Perspectives”) — there will be fewer. This so terribly grieves me.

I will be left — I, definitely a progressive Christian who embraces God’s covenant with us reflected in same-sex marriage, God’s respect for a woman’s discernment to become a mother or not, and Jesus’ wisdom in the greatness of a child (Luke 9:48). So, yes, the PCUSA will become more progressive by her going. And this grieves me, too.

What I trust worries us all is the fact that not just the PCUSA and the church in America are dividing this way. We all see how society is splitting into camps with different news sources and even claims about what’s real. It’s clear to me that the difference between Ms. Lott and me reflects this tension across our country.

I agree completely with Ms. Lott that the PCUSA “exists to bring good news of Jesus Christ to all his children.” I expect she would be surprised to know that I do not think the church is meant to be progressive or, I would add, conservative. The Presbyterian Church of my ancestors was founded in order to hold differing views like mine and Ms. Lott’s together. When we fail to live out Jesus’ desire “that they may be one” (John 17:11), it saddens me and, more importantly, wounds Christ.

The Reformed Church came to be in response to the violence of the Christian conflicts in Europe 600 years ago. Our core values reflect a way to live together with disagreement, in church or in society, rather than bashing one another over them. This way is simple on the surface but, obviously, difficult for people to practice.

Reflecting God’s love for all, here is the foundation — let’s say our core value —  for harmony in the PCUSA and anywhere, really: “In essentials, unity. In non-essentials, liberty. In all things, charity.”

What this means is, we agree that Jesus is our Lord and Savior — declaring this is the only requirement for membership in a PCUSA church. This is an essential upon which we need to agree. When Presbyterians like Ms. Lott judge my confession of faith in Christ to be unworthy of fellowship, it grieves me.

I do question how conservative Christians live out their faith; I do not judge the sincerity of their confession. How we live out our lives in Christ and how we interpret Scripture (and we all do) are non-essentials. We are free to follow the inspiration of the Holy Spirit that gives us different gifts and different perspectives. Conservatives bring a rootedness in tradition that is valuable to the church. Progressives like me bring an ear to God’s still small voice that calls us to the unknown. This is also valuable to the church.

READ MORE … 

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PMAB Team Proposes Strategy to Address Shared Services and Improve Donor Confidence https://www.layman.org/pmab-team-proposes-strategy-address-shared-services-improve-donor-confidence/ https://www.layman.org/pmab-team-proposes-strategy-address-shared-services-improve-donor-confidence/#comments Sat, 16 Sep 2017 09:17:47 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84287 (By Leslie Scanlon, The Presbyterian Outlook). A ministerial team of the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board that’s been considering how the Presbyterian Mission Agency (PMA) allocates overhead costs is recommending changes – concluding that the rates themselves are reasonable, but that the agency should generally charge agency departments a single, flat rate and that donors need more...

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(By Leslie Scanlon, The Presbyterian Outlook). A ministerial team of the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board that’s been considering how the Presbyterian Mission Agency (PMA) allocates overhead costs is recommending changes – concluding that the rates themselves are reasonable, but that the agency should generally charge agency departments a single, flat rate and that donors need more information about how such administrative costs are assessed.

Proposed: Setting a flat rate for overhead costs

Moving to a flat rate of 19 percent would raise the costs for some PMA departments (such as World Mission, which currently pays about 11 percent), but likely would free up about $2.4 million in unrestricted funds, “which may be directed to the negatively impacted departments to help smooth the transition,” the report states.

The team also concludes that PMA is not overcharging. “The PMA’s currently budgeted overall overhead allocation rate of 13 percent would be considered low compared to the rather broad range of acceptable allocation rates for large religious and nonprofit organizations,” the report states.

As a comparison, it cites work from The Bridgespan Group, which the report describes as “a well-respected nonprofit consulting firm for nonprofits,” and which found that overhead – or indirect – costs for such groups varied between 21 percent and 89 percent of direct costs.

The board is expected to consider the recommendations during its meeting in Louisville Sept. 21-23. The ministerial team which wrote the report – a team including both PMA board members and representatives from the Presbyterian Church (USA) national staff – is one of a rotating series of short-term ministerial teams the board has created to address specific issues.

This team is not the only group examining the fees and policies associated with what’s been described as overhead costs or shared services or common services – the varying definitions of what’s involved is part of the complexity.

A joint working group of the Way Forward Commission and All Agency Review Committee is hoping to release its report regarding shared services and the PC(USA)’s corporate entity by Sept. 20 – right before the PMA board meeting commences. That work group is also looking at how PMA charges the Office of the General Assembly (OGA) for what’s often referred to as shared services – costs associated with common services such as legal services and human resources.

Donor confidence
Most Presbyterians probably aren’t thinking very deeply about these things. It’s significant, however, for a number of reasons. More and more, Presbyterians are giving money designated for particular programs and uses – and not providing unrestricted funding that can be used to support necessary but low-profile work such as building maintenance.

Donor confidence in how the money is being handled is key.

READ MORE … 

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The Reconnect Interview: Hurricane Relief Ministry with ECO Pastor Alf Halvorson https://www.layman.org/reconnect-interview-hurricane-relief-ministry-eco-pastor-alf-halvorson/ https://www.layman.org/reconnect-interview-hurricane-relief-ministry-eco-pastor-alf-halvorson/#respond Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:00:04 +0000 https://www.layman.org/?p=84282 In the second half of the Sept. 14, 2017 Reconnect radio show, Carmen Laberge interviewed Dr. Alf Halvorson, who gives us a glimpse into the hurricane relief ministry of Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church in Houston, Texas. Their robust site, worthy of emulation, offers numerous practical resources, emotional coping tools, even an invitation for victims to...

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In the second half of the Sept. 14, 2017 Reconnect radio show, Carmen Laberge interviewed Dr. Alf Halvorson, who gives us a glimpse into the hurricane relief ministry of Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church in Houston, Texas. Their robust site, worthy of emulation, offers numerous practical resources, emotional coping tools, even an invitation for victims to tell their story- and is an example of incarnational ministry for any of life’s storms.

Listen to the interview here. (Interview Starts at the 28:25 mark)

Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church’s Hurricane Harvey Updates

 

The post The Reconnect Interview: Hurricane Relief Ministry with ECO Pastor Alf Halvorson appeared first on The Presbyterian Lay Committee.

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